There’s no revoluciòn without Che. The paths of Fidel Castro and Ernesto “Che” Guevara first crossed in Mexico in 1955. Fidel was in exile. He’d already taken part in failed assaults on the Cuban regime, while Che had given up his job as a doctor in Argentina to engage in the revoluciòn, wherever it took him. Together, during five years of guerrilla warfare, they managed to overturn the Cuban dictatorship. They then shared the first stages of government. The revolution created an unbreakable bond between them; politics, however, separated them forever. Che and Fidel did not see things in the same way, especially where international alliances were concerned. For Che, the USSR was an imperialist power like the US, a power to be rebelled against. Fidel, on the other hand, viewed the alliance with the USSR as the political path that might enable Cuba to remain revolutionary. In 1965 Che bid Fidel goodbye and left Cuba to back ruinous revolutions in Congo and Bolivia, where he was killed in 1967. Fidel declared three days of national mourning and governed Cuba for another 50 years.

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