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Russia: To Be Young and Reactionary


Immediately after the fall of the Soviet Union, Russia seemed rich in young people eager to usher the country into a new age of democratic and commercial success. But the crisis of 1998 began turning back the clock. Russian youth started falling back on Soviet-era models to decide work and life priorities. . Since the start of the Putin era, the transformation would seem complete. Though most Russian youth knows little or nothing about its Soviet past, it still longs for paternalism. It desperately seeks material success while at the same time evidencing Communist-era impotence.

Immediately after the fall of the Soviet Union, Russia seemed rich in young people eager to usher the country into a new age of democratic and commercial success. But the crisis of 1998 began turning back the clock. Russian youth started falling back on Soviet-era models to decide work and life priorities. . Since the start of the Putin era, the transformation would seem complete. Though most Russian youth knows little or nothing about its Soviet past, it still longs for paternalism. It desperately seeks material success while at the same time evidencing Communist-era impotence.

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