The infowar on Ukraine. How Putin took over Crimea without firing a single shot


Vladimir Putin sent troops to Crimea; no, he didn’t. Fascists now ruling the country threaten ethnic Russians in southern and eastern Ukraine; no, they don’t. The new government in Kiev is illegitimate and Viktor Yanukovich is the only president; no, he is most wanted for crimes against humanity. Euroamaidan was nothing but a coup led by russophobic extremists; no, it was a people’s revolution against a kleptocratic autoracy.

Vladimir Putin sent troops to Crimea; no, he didn’t. Fascists now ruling the country threaten ethnic Russians in southern and eastern Ukraine; no, they don’t. The new government in Kiev is illegitimate and Viktor Yanukovich is the only president; no, he is most wanted for crimes against humanity. Euroamaidan was nothing but a coup led by russophobic extremists; no, it was a people’s revolution against a kleptocratic autoracy.

 

There already was a war on Crimea in the past days, but it has been fought without tanks.

 

What is happening in Ukraine in these days proves at least two things: that who excluded Putin would invade Crimea was right, and that Putin already invaded Crimea. Let’s see how was this possible.

Russian media – both in Russia and the Russian language ones in Ukraine – covered the news from the barricades in Kyiv in a slightly different way, if compared to western media. This is not a news. But what makes it a novelty is that they did it in two different ways since the Euromaidan revolution started until former Ukrainian president Yanukovich fled the country, and after the new government was appointed. During all the three months of rallies in the Ukrainian capital city, Russian television channels and newspapers indubitably underestimated what was getting more and more the shape of a revolution. News were reported mostly on the background, and usually referred of episodes of violence led by hooligans targeting police and institutions. But all in a sudden – in the days when the Verhovna Rada voted for the destitution of Viktor Yanukovich and elected the new acting president Turchinov – the news from Kyiv started grabbing the headlines in Russia too. The Kremlin’s news war machine started to stake out the ground for Putin’s silent blitzkrieg on Ukraine.

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