Where is flight MH 370 now?


A US Technology Company which had 20 senior staff on board the Malaysian Airlines Flight MH 370, had launched a new electronic warfare software application for military radar systems, 5 days prior to the disappearance of the Boeing 777 into oblivion.

A US Technology Company which had 20 senior staff on board the Malaysian Airlines Flight MH 370, had launched a new electronic warfare software application for military radar systems, 5 days prior to the disappearance of the Boeing 777 into oblivion.

 

 

It sounds like an Agatha Christie thriller.
A 272 ton Boeing 777, one of aviation’s most trustworthy airplanes, takes off from Kuala Lumpur  International Airport, destination Beijing and vanishes less than an hour later into thin air.
Having fallen of all air traffic radar screens, it triggers a massive search involving 26 countries, all with the latest state of the art flight surveillance technology.
Days go by without any trace of the aircraft, while Big Brother says that he looks high and low and apparently finds nothing!
The world lost contact with Malaysian Airlines flight MH 370 early on March 8th 2014, somewhere in the sky between Malaysia and Vietnam.
Was the plane hijacked? And if so where are the passengers?
Or had it crashed into the sea, as some experts maintained at first?
But if that were the case, where is the debris?
Millions of people around the world, waiting for updates, were left wondering:
How can a 64-meter-long airplane, with 239 passengers on board, vanish from the sky without a trace, in the 21st Century?
Several days after the plane disappeared Malaysia’s Prime Minister was quoted as saying that “the disappearance was no accident” but the result of  “deliberate action, taken by someone onboard the plane”.
Less than an hour after take-off, someone deliberately switched off the plane’s two main modes of contact with the outside world: The ACARS (the Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System) and the Transponder, that sends the plane’s unique signature to ground control.
According to statements made by the Malaysian Authorities, the aircrafts co-Pilot 27 year old Fariq Abdul Hamid uttered the last known words from the cockpit to air-traffic ground control, which were “OK good night”.
Here possibly lies the answer. Indeed this was a very unusual message, possibly containing a coded destination (?).
Supposedly ten minutes later, it was reported that MH 370 had made a 90 degree turn to the left to fly over Sumatra into oblivion.
Or was it oblivion?
Did the plane actually turn left?
All the efforts made during the following days trying to guess where the plane ended up, ignore one simple fact. The all-seeing GPS!
The various attempts made, supposedly, by INMARSAT, the ship locating eye-in-the-sky, as well as others, pinned the wreckage of MH 370 in the Southern Indian Ocean. This has so far proved to be a fool’s errand.
Did not the GPS operators know where MH370 eventually landed?
Google relying on the US Defense Department’s twenty or so Satellites, circling the earth, can locate a static or a moving object on the ground – and on the water – to within ten meters. Surely they must know where MH370 is hiding or being hidden.
Would they inform the world where this is if that location is sinister?

The GPS works until the US Defense Department turns it off. 

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