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Coup and counter-coup


Having weathered the coup, it’s stronger than before. Closer to Moscow and further from Washington, but still in NATO, Erdogan appeals to democratic values and national unity.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan during a meeting at the White House. The recent failed coup has triggered a crisis between Ankara and Washington. REUTERS/KEVIN LAMARQUE/FILE PHOT/CONTRASTO

Having weathered the coup, it’s stronger than before. Closer to Moscow and further from Washington, but still in NATO, Erdogan appeals to democratic values and national unity.

After the failed coup organized by factions within the Turkish military in an attempt to overthrow President Recep
Tayyip Erdogan on 15 July, Turkey entered a historic transition period. For the first time in the Turkish Republic’s 93-year history, the Parliament building was bombed by F-16 war planes. There were clashes among pro- and anti-coup forces within the Turkish military as well as among the police and military forces. After Erdogan sounded the alarm, thousands of his supporters took to the streets, stopping tanks and battling against pro-coup forces.

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